The Mis-Education of Serenity Hughes: A Journey to Self Realization

When I stepped foot on Wellesley’s campus, I was overwhelmed by Whiteness. I felt like I was being drowned in a sea full of snow, surrounded by white and overwhelmed with the feeling of coldness. The specks of Black students scattered around campus gave me hope. Although these specks were scarce, seeing students that looked like me, who embodied excellence with indomitable perseverance, filled me with optimism in regards to the experience I would have at Wellesley. I became close with a handful of Black seniors when I was a first year, and they all recommended that I take a course with Professor Cudjoe; they described him as an influential figure that was down for the cause and always had his students’ backs. At first, I was apprehensive. Professor Cudjoe’s resume is long and astonishing, and I did not know if I was “good enough” to be his pupil, seeing that he has taught educators like Dr. Cornel West. After weeks of perturbation, I finally enrolled in a course taught by Professor Cudjoe: An Introduction to the Black Experience, which was the best decision I have ever made in my life. The Mis-Education of a Negro by Carter G. Woodson is one of the books that we read for Cudjoe’s course. This book had a profound impact on me, because what Mr. Woodson was saying resonated with me. I...

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